Reviews

ARC review: Lost Boy, Found Boy

36697937Lost Boy, Found Boy by Jenn Polish

Genre: Retelling, LGBTQAI+, Science Fiction
Release date: March 19th 2018 by NineStar Press
Purchase: Publisher | Amazon | Book Depository
LGBTQAI+: Transgender male MC, nonbinary LI, sapphic side characters.
Sex on page: No

In a futuristic world, Neverland is a holomatrix, Hook is a cyborg, and Tinker Bell is an automated computer interface. 

Peter is desperate to save his lover from a military draft that, unbeknownst to him, Mir volunteered for because they are desperate to be able to fly. So, naturally, Peter programs an entire island—Neverland—as a refuge where Mir can fly without having to fight in a war. 

But he doesn’t locate Mir right away; instead, he fights for control of the island with automated interface Tinker Bell, and in his attempts to find Mir, others arrive on the island. But Peter’s single-minded focus on Mir generates repercussions for everyone.

I received an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

But this wasn’t a kiss like any other; because by the time they both needed to breathe, by the time Peter’s hands were completely wound in Mir’s hair and Mir’s hands were thoroughly occupied with holding Peter at the hips, they both realized that they’d taken flight.

This was a lovely queer retelling of Peter Pan where Peter is trans, the main love interest is nonbinary (with they/them pronouns), “Wendy” and Tinker Bell are both sapphic, and “Captain Hook” is another one of their friends.

I loved the little intermissions (Tinker Bell’s “thoughts”) and the concept of Neverland as a virtual reality island. I also loved how so many parts of the original story, like Tinker Bell’s chiming or James’s hook was translated into this new world.

This story is less than 100 pages, and while some parts fell a little flat, I ended up loving it by the end. It also ends with one m/m/nb and one f/f relationship, which made my heart really happy.

Note: There are two comments in the early chapters where strangers misgender Peter based on his appearance, but thankfully this doesn’t happen later. There is also one sentence where I got a little confused, but I think he/him pronouns were used for Mir because it doesn’t make sense if the sentence was referring to someone else? I’m inclined to believe this was a typo/one-time mistake though because Mir’s pronouns are otherwise respected everywhere else.

The author is also nonbinary using they/them pronouns, so this is #ownvoices for nonbinary rep.

My rating: 🧚🧚🧚🧚🧚/5.

~ Alexa

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Reviews

Review: Transcendent 2: The Year’s Best Transgender Speculative Fiction 2016

36483451Transcendent 2: The Year’s Best Transgender Speculative Fiction 2016 edited by Bogi Takács

Genre: Anthology, LGBTQAI+, SFF
Published: October 22nd 2017 by Lethe Press
Length: 239 pages (Kindle edition)
Number of stories: 16
Purchase: Publisher | Amazon | Book Depository
LGBTQAI+: Every story in this anthology has trans and other queer characters with various identities.
Sex on page: No

As with the first volume of Transcendent, Lethe Press has worked with a wonderful editor to select the best work of genderqueer stories of the fantastical, stranger, horrific, and weird published the prior year. Featuring stories by Merc Rustad, Jeanne Thornton, Brit Mandelo, and others, this anthology offers time-honored tropes of the genre–from genetic manipulation to zombies, portal fantasy to haunts–but told from a perspective that breaks the rigidity of gender and sexuality.

I received a free copy from the editor, Bogi Takács in exchange for an honest review.

First of all, it was wonderful to see so many trans characters with various identities and experiences, including but far from being limited to various pronouns. There were characters with singular they, characters switching between he and she, and characters using several different sets of neopronouns.

That being said, this anthology was a bit of a mixed bag. There were some stories that I really enjoyed, but a disappointing number of them just didn’t really work for me for reasons that are difficult to verbalise.

Perhaps I should start by mentioning that this anthology had a short story by one of my favourite authors, RoAnna Sylver. I’ve read Happy REGARDS before in the Life Within Parole collection, and I adored – I still adore – it. Still, I was surprised and a little conflicted that it was included in this anthology, for one simple reason: I am not sure it can stand on its own. It has a wonderful cast of characters, but they exist within a world full of many stories – and when you read only one of those stories, things can get hectic and even confusing.

On a smaller scale, I felt this way about several of the other stories – like I was only getting part of the picture. Of course, there is nothing wrong with leaving things up to the reader’s interpretation, but in this anthology, a little too many stories left me baffled or yearning for a little more clarification. This might just be a personal preference, though.

What I really would have appreciated at the beginning is a list of trigger or content warnings for each story, since many of them deal with heavy topics like suicide, suicidal thoughts, depression, bullying… And probably others I either missed or suddenly can’t remember. A few of these are mentioned in the introduction, but I feel like a comprehensive list could have been useful.

I wanted to get those thoughts out of the way, but I also want to talk about the parts that I genuinely enjoyed, so here are a few words about my favourite stories:

Because Change Was The Ocean And We Lived By Her Mercy: My favourite story in this collection, honestly. (Other than Happy REGARDS, of course, but that should go without saying at this point.) Because Change Was The Ocean is a solarpunk-ish story about community and belonging and I would gladly give it five out of five stars. Or more.

Skerry-Bride: This was one of the shortest stories I think, but it had wonderful descriptions about the POV character’s shapechanging lover. There are also many Norse mythology elements.

Transitions: This story was interesting because it started out as a completely ordinary, present-day story about transition, and by that I mean lacking any speculative elements – then some aspects of Indigenous culture were worked into the story and it fit together beautifully.

and, of course, Happy REGARDS: If you follow me on any kind of social media, you have probably seen me scream about Chameleon Moon and RoAnna’s other works before. Happy REGARDS is a wonderful short story that focuses on Evelyn, Danae and Rose’s family, including some siblings, in-laws, and found/chosen family as well.

My rating: ☄️☄️☄️☄️/5

~ Alexa